Posted in Dungeons&Dragons, Gamernation News, Writing, Writing Prompts

Prompt List of Sarcasm

Happy Wednesday. The week is half way over and I can hardly wait. My week has been super busy lately and it will continue for the rest of the week thanks to my classroom observations. Despite the busy schedule, I’m just glad I can attend.

My article for Gamer Nation News is up and you can find it here. You can read my rant on the changes made to Adventures League for Season 8. Part 2 will be coming out maybe later this month or next month. I’m hoping there’s a few more positive changes made before I make the second article. Fingers crossed.

As is (sort of) customary on Wednesdays, I like to post writing prompts that I found and have written. This time however, I did find a list of sarcasm writing prompts that was to good to leave alone. You can find the link here. Enjoy.

writing prompt

Posted in Dungeons&Dragons, updates, Writing

A Lot on My Plate

I’m happy to announce that I’m still breathing. It’s been a hectic week that hasn’t given me much time to post anything. The good news is that I finally started my classroom observations and that taken up so much of my time. It’s great to see teachers with Kindergartners and second graders. I’ve learned so much by just observing. Everyone has a different teaching style and there’s definitely strategies that I want to use.

Of course this was all after GateCon 2 where I spent all weekend (Wed. – Sun.) playing Dungeons & Dragons last week. This was for, uh, research purposes. Sometimes, the best dialogue is through role playing at the table. Plus, it’s so interesting to see other players role play so many different personalities. I’ve heard some of the best insults at the table too. It’s dialogue gold. Not to mention that I think I’ve had my fill of large social gatherings. This sort of excitement will keep me going for the next few months until the holidays.

Despite my busy schedule, I have had time to write. This is mostly done during work (don’t tell my boss) when I can. At this point, I probably have Google Docs open on all computers. So far, my co-workers don’t seem to mind. I’m just trying to make this all work somehow. This probably means that I have to get better at organizing and managing my time. But I think there’s hope for me yet.

Even though I’m getting my teaching certificate, I still haven’t given up on writing and I don’t think it will. Since I was a child, I’ve been interested in being a teacher. I didn’t discover my love of writing until much later. However, I realize that writing isn’t going to pay the bills anytime soon. Sure, I got a content editing job on the side and that’s super great but, in essence, it’s not enough. At least, it isn’t right now. I know that I have to do what I have to do.

My goal is still to become a published author. After that goal is accomplish, I just want to keep publishing and share my stories to whoever wants to read them. My wattpad story is coming along nicely and that’s almost finished. I’ve decided to rewrite it so that I can say that I like it as oppose to just being my fans. I’ll end up self-publishing this story I think. I won’t think about that until I’m closer to a finish product that I’m proud of.

For now, wish me luck. I have a lot of my plate.

 

 

Posted in Methods, Writing

RP and Storytelling

It’s been close to a year that I fully got into playing Dungeons and Dragons. It’s been a lot less than that since I took up the role as a Dungeon Master.

In this role, I basically give the players a situation, e.g. they are hired as guards by a merchant to escort him and her goods to the next trade city, and they play out tue scenarios as they wish. Of course, this situations are part of modules and hard-cover campaigns so mostly everything is scripted.

As a player, I’ve had really good DMs. They manage to bring the world to life with a couple of words and it’s so easy to imagine everything that’s happening in the scene and round by round. It’s flawless how they can paint so vivid images. As a DM (dungeon master), I know I will never be able to do that.

It’s not like I’m putting myself done or anything. I just know that that’s never going to be me. I won’t be able to paint vivid worlds with the spoken word, I plan to do this through the written world.

Lately, I’ve been hyper aware of how I described an environment/scene to my players. They rely on me for information and it’s my job to provide it to them. This is similar to writing a story. The readers need information, not only to comprehend what’s going on but also to imagine the world you’ve built in your head.

This has helped me in my writing because describing the situation or environment in speech tells me that maybe I’ve forgotten to include sensory details or perhaps one social interaction didn’t go so smoothly.

By taking note on all of this, writing and describing things has gotten easier. I’m aware of what I’m missing and try to include everything I can. Of course, I do this in moderation. Personally, I don’t like to bog down my readers with so much description. I try to only include all the necessary information.

While I haven’t exactly perfected all of this and I have a long way to go, I’m going to keep learning. I believe as a writer that there’s always something new to learn. Perhaps one writing style doesn’t fit a genre or theme. The beauty of it is that I can try new things and figure out what works with the story I want to write.

Posted in Methods, Writing

D&D: Writing you own Campaign

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What’s Dungeons and Dragons have to do with writing a story? Everything.

To those who aren’t familiar with D&D, I’ll give you a quick overview. Dungeons and Dragons is a table-top, fantasy, role-playing game set in the Forgotten Realms. Those familiar with R.A. Salvatore‘s Drizzt Do’Urden might know a little something about the world. For those who don’t know Drizzt then take a look at the popular show Stranger Things. Mike, Dustin, Lucas, and Will played D&D in the pilot of the show and even in the last episode.

The major component about the game is storytelling and that’s where this post comes in. For starters, there is ‘a lot’ to know about playing D&D but I won’t go into too much detail. Instead, I’ll focus on how to build your own campaign for what’s called a ‘home-brew game.’ This term just means that you made a game set in the Forgotten Realms. It can also mean that you created your own world and are simply using the game mechanics of D&D like the dice rolling, the encounters, etc.

I should also mention that I went to Compicpalooza 2017 and was able to take down notes on many of the panels. The topic for this post was selected from my many notes so, in essence, it’ll be an overview of the advice and tips that I received.

  1. There’s no order in building your campaign and that holds true with writing.

You can start with your characters (in this case it can be your NPCs – the many roles you’ll take on as a DM (Dungeon Master – the one who runs the campaign)). If possible, it’s best to add as many NPCs beforehand. If needed, ‘someone’ will exist for your ‘adventures’ to come talk to and you won’t have to manifest them on the spot and remember them later.

Or your world. Or an object players (the ‘heroes’) have to find or destroy. That’s for you to decide.

Perhaps even your antagonist. This can be from anything you really want – a blood mage or a dragon.

However, for those building your own world, the terrain/ the environment is something to keep in mind. Is it mountainous? Plains? Forest? The Sea? The adventure will depend on what kind of area the players have to traverse. Plus, it would also make the encounters (the ‘enemy/beasts) plays will have to fight.

For the world building, you don’t have to know how to draw a map. There are pre-made maps and map generators available. Like donjon; RPG Tools. There are a lot of resources online to make it easier.

2. Basic Fundamentals of the World

The more details you know about your world the better. Just like writing anything, it is best to know almost everything you need to know about your world. That way, you won’t have to make things up on the spot and possibly forget about it later. I’m not saying it’s bad to make things up but I find that it disrupts the flow of the story. Plus, if you do have everything planned then it makes the world seem more real. Not only that but if you know the relationships between towns or tribes then you can use that as a source of conflict (if needed).

3. Managing your players

It’s not really a rule of thumb but your players are what makes the story. As the DM, you create the story and basically, the players help you write it. The story may go on a different path that you intended but it’s okay. Plans are subjected to change. It’s not like the story went out the window or anything. The DM is there to help guide the players through the story. There has to be some level of control but don’t force them to stay on that path only. Let them explore.

Whatever you don’t use then recycle it for another adventure. I do that in writing all the time. I can’t use something in one story but if I can use it in another story, then I will.

Like any story, there are going to character backstories. As a DM, you can use these to create a different arc or build it into the story. Just give your players something to care about. That’s what the core is for any story. Keep them invested.

Final thoughts:

Have fun. If you’re not having fun then why would your players be?Don’t get caught up in the details. They’re more like guidelines.