Posted in updates, Writing

Finding the Middle

Another week comes to an end. Progress has been slow but there has been progress. Unfortunately, there wasn’t a post Monday. I got caught up with errands and school work. I promised myself I’ll do better.

I did go back and take a look at Crimson Queen, the story I worked on for Camp NaNoWriMo. Reading through, I realized that the beginning worked. The middle on the other hand didn’t. There was no direction. So, I went back through it and wrote down the main plot points that I found. There was a couple of them but they were just buried under unnecessary scenes/ words.

Moving forward, I need to fill in the blanks to get from one point to another. That “filling” has to be relevant to the story and has to contribute. Otherwise, the words become unnecessary and I don’t want that. Plus, I have the information, the filling if you will, I just have to find a way to add everything together.

With school going on now, I have to steal time to write until I get a schedule down. It’s going slower than I would like to. For sure this upcoming week, there’s going to be a post Monday. Wednesday is still writing prompt day. I’m having really fun with those prompts. They’re different but I need a way to get out of my comfort zone. I need to write something I wouldn’t normally write. Is there a website for random writing prompts? I definitely have to look for that.

If anyone has any suggest, send a message/ comment and I’ll see what I can do. Thanks for reading.

Posted in Writing, Writing Prompts

Writing Prompt -Summons

You attempt to pronounce some of the furniture names at IKEA. In doing so, you’ve summoned a demon.

A strange smell wafted from behind me. Wrinkling my nose, I turned around looking for an outbreak of fire. But there was no fire.

Instead, I found a small boy. He had khaki shorts and a blue t-shirt. He looked around eight years old? I wasn’t good with guessing age but he couldn’t be too old. With a frown on his face, he looked around the bedroom display area.

“Hey, there,” I called out. “Are you lost? Do you need help looking for your parents?”

The boy finally looked at me. Dark red eyes narrowed.

“You summoned me?”

Wow. Deep voice. He must be hitting puberty early. Was that normal? Then again, the size of kids these days – well, they were growing rapidly. People still mistook me as someone in middle school.

I looked around, hoping to flag an associate down but I didn’t see anyone. Great.

“Um, so, I can take you to the check-out area. They got these things that announce information throughout the store. They can help you find your parents.” I added a smile for a good measure.

“So, you’re deaf and dumb.”

My eye twitched. This – this – okay, let’s take a deep breath. I forced a smile.

“Do you need help?” I asked.

He crossed his arms. “I’d say you need help. That is why you’ve summoned me, yes?”

“Summoned?”

The boy sighed. His foot began to tap. “Yes, summoned.”

“Uh huh.”

I opened my mouth and closed it. Right, I wasn’t getting through to him.

“Let’s take a step back. What’s your name?”

The stare was back. “You’ve summoned me and yet you do not know.” His eyes glowed. “Tell me what you need so I can return to my own world.”

I took a step back. My foot stuck the bottom of the bed. I teetered for a moment before regaining my balance. He was something else entirely. It had to be a trick of the light.

“Listen, let’s go find your parents. They’re really worried right now.”

“I’m a thousand year old demon,” the boy intoned. “I have no parents.

This wasn’t working. I chewed on my lip.

“Okay,” I said, slowly. “So, let’s make a deal.”

His eyes lit up. “Finally.”

“Help me, help you find your parents.”

The boy sighed. He shook his head muttering in a weird language.

“I am a demon. You summoned me. Tell me what you want.”

I frowned. “No, I didn’t.”

“Yes you did.”

“I already told you!”

“Fine. I’m leaving.”

He clapped his hands once, but nothing happened. He sighed. We stared at each other for a moment.

“Fine,” he finally said, “let’s go.”

We were finally getting somewhere. I cleared my throat. “Well, the check-out is downstairs.”

“Just, just lead the way.”

I started walking towards the stairs. I kept looking over my shoulder to make sure he was still there. He kept muttering to himself in that strange language. I couldn’t place it at all. Maybe Google translate could help.

At the thought, I shook my head. I could only imagine how that would go. No, the best thing was to find this “demon’s” parents.

Posted in Writing, Writing Prompts

Writing Prompt – D&D Adventure

“There used to be six of us . . . Now I am alone.”

Five pair of various colored eyes turned around and looked at me. Their brows were creased.

“What are you talking about?” the book loving wizard asked. “We’re about to be rich!”

I shook my head and didn’t respond.

“We have just liberated a cultist infected castle,” the beast of a barbarian spoke up. “We deserved to get paid.”

His smaller companion, only four feet in height nodded in agreement. “When you hired us, you said we could keep what we found.”

They were mercenaries after all. I wasn’t surprised not really. Sure, I liked loot too but if this was anything like the other chest, we were probably going to get our faces melted off like the lightning strucked sorcerer.

You would think he learned his lesson but no, he was up there along with the others staring at the red wardrobed.

It leaned against a dark wall. Beside it was a desk with documents spread all across it. The dwarf was there. Shifting through the parchment, trying to find any clues as to where the leaders of the cultists had gone.

“Good luck,” I told them.

“Then you get no loot,” the wizard piped up.

“You guys ready?” the small roguish mercenary asked.

She stepped forward, theives tools in hand. As she did, I walked out of the room. I pressed my back against the wall. There was no way I was going to get caught in the trap.

I heard the wardrobe open and a hiss. Cries of pain and shock echoed from the room. I waited for a few moments before peeking into the room. Acid bubbled and hissed across the ground. My companions laid on the ground, moaning in agony. The smell of burnt flesh wafted through the room.

Whatever the wardrobe held at one point was gone. It now stood as a blob of melted wood. I squatted down by the doorway.

“So,” I said, “who needs healing?”

Groan answered me.