Posted in NaNoWriMo, Writing

Optimistic

I am happy to announce that I was able to write two of the scenes that I set out to write today. Sure they could have been longer but that doesn’t worry or bother me too much. All that matter…

Source: Optimistic

Posted in Uncategorized, Writing

Edit vs Revise

I have talked a little about revision and given some tips on how to tackle that but it came to my attention that editing a project and revising it are two different things. There are some people that use these two words interchangeably and I’m guilty of doing this too.

I could say that it’s obvious that editing and revising are two completely different things but at the same time I think it’s a piece of knowledge that you know somewhere in the back of your mind but you don’t actually think about it often. Because of this, I’m going to do a little break down about the differences between revising and editing.

Editing
This includes anything to deal with grammar; spelling, syntax, etc. These are essentially the small changes you make. Nouns should be capitalized. Verbs should be use correctly. You’re not sure if you used a word correctly, pull out a dictionary. I understand it to be all the nitty gritty of grammar; comma usage, quotes, periods and everything else. The essentials of a good sentence.

Revising
When you revise, you get into the heart and soul of a story. You add or delete sentences or words. If you got a plot hole, it’s good to change the plot. A scene or dialogue doesn’t add tension or move a story along? Either delete or rewrite. You have one word that repeats too much? Let’s take out a thesaurus. Remember: the backspace button is your best friend. I also view revising as a stage where you might end up rewriting your whole story if the plot isn’t very strong. It’s all about adding and deleting from your work.

In the long run, I will suggest that you edit and revise your own work for a better read. You don’t have to get it professionally edited and I don’t believe it is mandatory. You can ask a friend to help you edit and for revision as well. If you are able to get your work edited by a professional then, go for it. Either way, as long as you accept that your work isn’t going to be perfect then that’s a step in the right direction.

P.S. For some reason, I completely forgot that I hadn’t posted anything on Friday(5/6/16). I guess that’s what happens when you’re trying to graduate college. Any-who, thanks for the patience.
P.P.S. I’m finally a college graduate.

Posted in Methods, Writing

Rewrite- How to?

Finishing a manuscript is one of the greatest accomplishments you can achieve. It’s tough work starting from scratch and typing up the last word but the rewards are great. However, sometimes, well, most of the times, it doesn’t end there. Next, comes editing and for the most part, this also includes rewriting some scenes, entire chapters, or maybe even the entire story.

There are many ways to edit a manuscript and there are many different ways it can be done depending on the writer. However, the most important part is to let the manuscript sit for a while before actually starting to edit it. If the story is still ‘fresh’ in your mind then you won’t be able to notice anything wrong with it. The time away from the manuscript depends on the person.

I liked to find a few close friends/beta readers and ask them to read my manuscript. Not only do I take some time off but it also gives me something to wait on e.g. critiques/comments. It’s also during this time that I like to look over my characters and notes. I’m not looking to change anything but I do think about the ways in which I wrote my characters and if I brought them to life on the page. I also tend to replay key scenes in my head and re-imagine them. What would happen if I change this particular line of dialogue? Or what if I make my character do this instead?

Although I keep repeating myself I will always say that no one method of editing is wrong or right. One way may work better for one person than another.

It’s also a good idea, I found, to convert your manuscript into a .pdf file and read it like a book. You can’t edit and it forces you to read your story without being able to change anything. I typically do this during my waiting time, looking specifically for sentences that don’t really make sense or could use improvement and for small typos. Usually when I read my manuscript I can get a hint of what is missing but they aren’t set in stone until I get back some comments. Usually, my suspicions are correct and some comments point out things that need improvements.

Taking critiques comes with a grain of salt. Some people might respond differently to your writing and that’s okay. Ultimately, it’s your choice as a writer that counts. If the plot is lacking, you usually have to rewrite the entire story but even then that’s nothing to feel dishearten about. I have rewritten one manuscript five times, from scratch, and though it has taken over five years to make it feel right,  it’s the best possible version that it could be. Scenes can be written and so can dialogue.

As long as you’re willing to make changes and abandon some things then rewriting will be easier. Accept the fact that it won’t be easy to begin with and go from there.